ACTI codes

Course Activity Codes (ACTI) is a taxonomy created by the Oregon Community College and Workforce Development office to organize courses into categories for approval purposes. Following is information prepared by COCC's Institutional Effectiveness Office (revised 11/2013).

Originator of code: State

Definition: Categorizes a course to a particular area (see ACTI Definitionsbelow prepared by Community Colleges and Workforce Development CCWD in 2010).

 

Activity Code Title Definition
100 Lower Division Collegiate Courses which are parallel to offerings of the first two years of Oregon's four-year institutions and are generally accepted for transfer at Oregon's four-year institutions.
210 Career/Tech Preparatory Courses that prepare persons for entrance into specific occupations or clusters of closely related occupations and which are part of a state approved career technical education program.
211

Standalone CTE Prep

(does not lead to a state-approved Certificate or degree)

Courses that prepare persons for entrance into specific occupations or clusters of closely related occupations and which are independent and standalone separately from a state approved career technical education program.
220 Career/Tech Supplementary Courses that prepare persons for employment stability and advancement in specific occupations or clusters of closely related occupations.
230 Career/Tech Apprenticeship Courses developed by a trade, craft or occupation that include instructional objectives and an outline of course content for related training and manipulative instruction.
310 English as a Second Language Courses in basic English [communication] skills that prepare adults whose native language is not English to achieve English levels essential for work, further education, family self-sufficiency, and community and civic participation. The main focus of instruction is on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, basic computer literacy, and critical thinking skills. Instruction is intended for students with educational functioning levels (EFLs) 1-6 in the skills taught.
320 Adult Basic Education Courses that prepare adults with skills below the secondary level in reading, writing, mathematics, speaking/listening in English, basic computer literacy, and critical thinking skills. These courses differ from Adult Continuing Education: Workforce (363) because they focus on academic preparation rather than preparation for a specific workforce need. Instruction is intended for students with educational functioning levels (EFLs) 3-6 in the skills taught.
330 General Education Development Courses that prepare adults with skills below the post-secondary level and who have not graduated from high school with the skills and knowledge needed for postsecondary education, secure employment, and community and civic participation. Instruction is intended for students with educational functioning levels (EFLs) 7-8 in the skills taught.
340 Adult High School Classes in which the sole purpose is to prepare students who have not graduated from high school to obtain an Adult High School Diploma or a diploma from a cooperating high school.
350 Post-Secondary Remedial PSR RD or WR Courses numbered below 100 in reading and writing.
351 Post-Secondary Remedial Math Courses numbered below 100 in math.
352 Post-Secondary Remedial Electives Courses numbered below 100, not including reading , writing and math
360 Adult Continuing Ed-Other (Unknown) ACE Courses that do not fall into other defined ACE ACTI Code Categories. These courses must be at least 6 contact hours in length.
361 Adult Continuing Ed-Health & Fitness Adult Continuing Education courses that are noncredit and focus on noncompetitive physical fitness and/or health courses that focus on the knowledge and skills that promote healthy lifestyles over a lifetime. These courses must be at least 6 contact hours in length.
362 Adult Cont Ed-Safety Adult Continuing Education courses that are noncredit and promote safe practices over a lifetime. These courses must be 6 hours in length.
363 Adult Cont Ed-Workforce Adult Continuing Education courses that are open-enrollment based and noncredit that on the knowledge, skills and personal abilities people need to succeed in the workplace, increase life skills and engage in civic participation. These courses must be at least 6 contact hours in length.
510 Non-Reimbursable-Other Courses that do not meet the intent of other course definitions or are under 6 contact hours.
511 Non-Reimbursable-Hobby & Rec Courses taken for enjoyment which result in physical activities that individuals could reasonably be expected to participate in during most of their adult lives, those which result in the collection of objects or the production of works. These courses are not eligible for FTE reimbursement.
512 Non-Reimbursable-Other/Admin Courses sections that are non-reimbursable but tracked by colleges for administrative purposes.

Where it resides: Course Level

Who is responsible for deciding appropriate code?

  • Credit: Director of Curriculum and Assessment (Vickery Viles)
  • Community Learning: Director of Continuing Education (Glenda Lantis)
  • Adult Basic Skills: Director of Secondary Programs (Debbie Hagan)

Who is responsible for implementing the code in Banner?
Entered in SCADTL in supplemental data (its not called ACTIcode in banner)

  • Credit: Director of Curriculum and Assessment (Vickery Viles)
  • Community Learning: Title (Sue Wood)
  • Adult Basic Skills: Title (tbd)

How is it used for tracking/reporting?
The state defined ACTI codes are the primary attribute by whichthe state reports and funds student activity. It has also been used by the state to assign credit students to eitherCTE or Transfer related majors depending on the level of activity in variousACTI codes. The state does not seecourses in relation to credit.

Internally COCC reports student activity/FTE by ACTI code whenreporting program mix in the annual Fact Book.

NOTES/ITEMS TO CONSIDER: CCWD just recently went to the effort to better define ACTI codes. There is potential for new codes to beintroduced as the state prepares to address growing accountability demands atthe state and federal level.