Psychology Course Outcomes

Outcomes for PSY 101:  Applied Psychology

  1. Articulate the philosophical basis for the major approaches to psychological inquiry (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, physiological). 
  2. Label and explain the steps of the scientific method, including control conditions, quantifiable dependent measures, identification of independent variables with operational definitions, sampling techniques, subject selection and assignment, and basic procedures.  Apply these steps to the main varieties of empirical methodology.
  3. Understand the basic processes by which external stimuli become internal and so contribute to cognition, information processing and intelligibility of the surrounding world.  This includes demonstration of a working knowledge of the sensory systems, and their influence on the production of behavior, with consideration of such interpretive operations as top-down and bottom-up processing.  Identify potential disrupters of perceptual systems, such as chemicals or trauma.
  4. Describe the major approaches to understanding behavioral processes involved in learning and memory, including the historical bases and empirical techniques of each, as well as the philosophical similarities and differences.  Apply each of these approaches to the modification of undesirable behavior patterns, either in groups or interpersonal settings.
  5. Discuss the historical and contemporary bases for determining intelligence (i.e., testing and evaluation).  Incorporate notions of validity, reliability and significance.  Evaluate the impact of the various methods and approaches to understanding the concept of intelligence and discuss the potential individual, educational, societal and political impacts.  Elaborate on the various proposed types of intelligence.  Also, discuss the appropriateness and significance of using these testing tools in the workplace.
  6. Present the major theories regarding cognitive processes related to problem solving.  Apply these techniques to real-life problems.
  7. Identify the various stages encountered during a normal course of development for a human being.  Discuss the major theories regarding cognitive and physical development and their interactions.  Also, present the evidence for events that will interrupt normal developmental outcomes (e.g., teratogens).
  8. Present the evidence for the evolution of emotions in humans and non-humans.  Include cross-cultural evidence for primary and secondary emotions and their uses as communication, both in organizations and interpersonal situations. 
  9. Evaluate the various models for determining the motivational state of an individual, with attention to the various types of motivation.  Include a thorough presentation of the importance of understanding individual motivations for personal and societal purposes (e.g., relationships with co-workers, justice system).
  10. Identify the different sources of stressors and analyze the potential effects of adjustment strategies for physical and psychological health.  Discuss these issues in terms of impact on behavior as well.
  11. Identify the major psychological disorders, their symptoms and hypothesized causes.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of which treatment is currently considered optimal.
  12. Discuss the key components of verbal and non-verbal communication systems.  Incorporate strategies for improving listening as well as message delivery to avoid miscommunication.
  13. Summarize the research regarding the influence of group dynamics on the behavior of individuals.  Evaluate methods for maximizing efficiency of working within groups for positive results and avoiding behaviors that result in disharmony and dissatisfaction within the group.

Measurements for PSY 101:  Applied Psychology 

Students will demonstrate their knowledge in these areas through: 

  1. formal examinations, which include objective questions and short answers;
  2. analysis of case studies and applied situations requiring problem solving, both on a group and individual level;
  3. articulation of ideas and concepts through verbal class participation; and
  4. exposure to assessment tools through active participation  (e.g., completing personality inventories).


Outcomes for PSY 201:  Mind & Brain

  1. Articulate the philosophical basis for the major approaches to psychological inquiry (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, physiological). 
  2. Exhibit knowledge of the historical evolution of psychology as a science.
  3. Label and explain the steps of the scientific method, including control conditions, quantifiable dependent measures, identification of independent variables with operational definitions, sampling techniques, subject selection and assignment, and basic procedures.  Apply these steps to the main varieties of empirical methodology.
  4. Understand the use of basic descriptive and inferential statistics in the analysis and interpretation of data.  Be able to discuss the legitimate and ethical uses of results.
  5. Analyze the interactions among anatomy, physiology, and environment in the production of behavior.  This includes discussion of nervous system function as well as sensory systems and perceptual processes.
  6. Describe the major approaches to understanding behavioral processes involved in learning and memory, including the empirical techniques of each, as well as the philosophical similarities and differences.
  7. Discuss the historical and contemporary bases for determining intelligence (i.e., testing and evaluation).  Incorporate notions of validity, reliability and significance.  Evaluate the impact of the various methods and approaches to understanding the concept of intelligence and discuss the potential individual, educational, societal and political impacts.  Elaborate on the various proposed types of intelligence.
  8. Present the evidence for the evolution of emotions in humans and non-humans.  Include cross-cultural evidence for primary and secondary emotions and their uses as communication.
  9. Provide a workable definition of language, with arguments for and against its existence any species but humans. Be able to discuss the components of a functional language system (e.g., morphemes, phonemes, syntax).
  10. Evaluate the various theories for determining the motivational state of an individual, with attention to the various types of motivation.  Include a thorough presentation of the importance of understanding the biological, emotional, social and cultural contributions to individuals' motivations and subsequent behavior.

Measurements for PSY 201:  Mind & Brain

Students will demonstrate their knowledge in these areas through: 

  1. formal examinations, which include objective questions and short answers;
  2. formal written assignments, which require appropriate grammatical construction to convey coherent thoughts, and use of an approved scientific format;
  3. articulation of ideas and concepts through verbal class participation.

PSY 202: Mind & Society

  1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the methods and research designs used in the empirical study of psychology as a science. Students will be able to identify and discuss their understanding of ethical issues in psychological research.  Psychology is a science and does not need the clarification of "social"
  2.  Students will be able to distinguish between the major historical schools of thought in psychology and the major current philosophies, and demonstrate an understanding of how these schools of thought continue to influence the field of psychology.  There are those who would argue that "impact" is not a verb, but an effect.
  3. Students will be able to identify a normal sequence of human development (physical, cognitive, socio-emotional).
  4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the history of sexology, common sexual disorders and treatment, and societal issues related to human sexuality. Students will demonstrate an understanding of normal sexual development and maturation, sexual orientation, gender role development, and gender differences.
  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the area of personality psychology, including its historical roots, current theories and lines of research, and personality testing.
  6. Students will be able to identify specific psychological disorders (symptoms, prevalence, and etiology) and appropriate treatments.
  7. Students will be able to identify and analyze issues relevant to health psychology, including the biopsychosocial model of wellness, and the impact of lifestyle on physical and mental health.
  8. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the influence of the social group on individual behavior. Students will analyze social factors in social cognition, social relations, and social influence on group processes.
  9. Students will be able to identify the application of psychological principles across a variety of settings, including personal and professional.
  10.  Students will be able to identify main psychological themes discussed in peer-reviewed journal articles. In addition, students will be able to critically analyze complicated psychological principles through formal writing and in class-discussion.

PSY 213:  Introduction to Physiological Psychology Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an appropriate use of terms and theories related to the field of physiological psychology.
  2. Identify the structures and functions of the nervous system, endocrine system, and immune system as they are integrated into behavior. For example, students will be able to recognize structures of the brain and sensory systems from a diagram, a model or a dissection.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the application of scientific method to the study of the biology of behavior, (i.e., by critically analyzing and/or proposing a scientific test of a claim about the biological aspects of behavior)
  4. Discriminate among the diagnostic technologies used to study brain function and brain structure.  Evaluate the appropriate uses of each.
  5. Identify the contributions of prominent theorists in the field of physiological psychology.

Outcomes for PSY 215:  Developmental Psychology

  1. Articulate the philosophical bases for the major approaches to psychological inquiry (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, physiological) as they relate to developmental psychology.
  2. Label and explain the steps of the scientific method, including control conditions, quantifiable dependent measures, identification of independent variables with operational definitions, sampling techniques, subject selection and assignment, and basic procedures.  Apply these steps to the main varieties of empirical methodology in the investigation of the developmental processes that contribute to behavior throughout the lifespan.
  3. Synthesize and critically evaluate information from various sources, including text, lecture, visual media, original research articles and review articles as they apply to developmental processes.
  4. Analyze the interactions of genetics, cytoplasmic processes, prenatal conditions, perinatal events, parenting styles, societal practices and cultural approaches as they influence an individual's phenotype, both behavioral and physical.
  5. Present the stages of development observed during the prenatal period.  Critically assess the evidence derived from twin-studies and other research techniques regarding the nature-nurture dichotomy.    Also, present the evidence for events that will interrupt normal developmental outcomes during this time frame (e.g., teratogens).
  6. Describe the developmental stages, including cognitive, social and physical, that occur during infancy.  Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining later behavior, with consideration of plasticity versus stability.
  7. Describe the developmental stages, including cognitive, social and physical, that occur during early childhood.  Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining later behavior, with consideration of plasticity versus stability.
  8. Present the hallmarks of cognitive, social and physical development in middle childhood.    Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining later behavior, with consideration of plasticity versus stability.
  9. Describe the developmental stages, including cognitive, social and physical, that occur during adolescence.  Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining later behavior, with consideration of plasticity versus stability.  Include analyses of cohort effects and potential modifications for existing theories of developmental outcomes.
  10.  Describe the developmental stages, including cognitive, social and physical, that occur during early adulthood.  Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining later behavior, with consideration of plasticity versus stability.  Include analyses of cohort effects and potential modifications for existing theories of developmental outcomes.
  11.  Identify the different sources of stressors related to life changes typically encountered and analyze the potential effects of adjustment strategies for the physical and psychological health of young, middle and older adults.  Discuss these issues in terms of impact on behavior as well.
  12.  Describe the developmental stages, including cognitive, social and physical, that occur during middle adulthood.  Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining later behavior, with consideration of plasticity versus stability.  Include analyses of cohort effects and potential modifications for existing theories of developmental outcomes.
  13. Describe the developmental stages, including cognitive, social and physical, that occur during late adulthood.  Compare the major theoretical explanations for the importance of this time period in determining adjustment to life changes such as retirement and widowhood.  Include analyses of cohort effects and potential modifications for existing theories of developmental outcomes.
  14.  Summarize the research regarding the social, cultural and political topics surrounding death.  Articulate the arguments for various controversial issues in a balanced manner that is empirically supported, rather than showing a reliance on opinions only.
  15.  Apply the principals of developmental theories, including characteristic behaviors, stages and outcomes, to a real-life setting, through observation and/or direct interaction with age appropriate subjects.

Measurements for PSY 215: Developmental Psychology (Lifespan)

Students will demonstrate their knowledge in these areas through: 

  1. formal examinations, which include objective questions, short answers, and organized essays;
  2. observation, interaction, experimentation and/or interviews with target populations;
  3. formal written assignments presenting results, critical evaluation of applied theories and synthesis of ideas through use of an approved format;
  4. articulation of ideas and concepts through verbal class participation; and
  5. exposure to assessment tools through active participation, with evaluation and understanding of the rationale expressed through formal written examination.  All of the above written components require competence in grammatical construction and organization of ideas to convey complex concepts in a coherent way. 

Outcomes for PSY 219:  Abnormal Psychology

  1. Articulate the historical and philosophical bases for the major approaches to psychological inquiry (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, physiological) as they relate to the scientific study of abnormal behavior. 
  2. Label and explain the steps of the scientific method, including control conditions, quantifiable dependent measures, identification of independent variables with operational definitions, sampling techniques, subject selection and assignment, and basic procedures.  Apply these steps to the main varieties of empirical methodology in the investigation of the processes that contribute to abnormal behavior.
  3. Synthesize and critically evaluate information from various sources, including text, lecture, visual media, original research articles and review articles as they apply to the study of abnormal behavior.
  4. Analyze the interactions of genetics, cytoplasmic processes, prenatal conditions, perinatal events, parenting styles, societal practices and cultural approaches as they influence an individual's behavior, for both negative and positive outcomes.
  5. Examine the historical models for determining and categorizing abnormal behaviors.  Critically evaluate each approach's validity and support, as well as contributions to contemporary psychotherapeutic approaches.
  6. Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to anxiety, panic, obsessions and compulsions, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  7. Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to mood, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Include discussions of coping strategies employed by affected individuals, including the various forms of suicide.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  8.  Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to psychosocial and physical disorders, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Present the data for the contributions of stressors that are typically encountered, and the effects of the physical, emotional and cognitive adjustments that may be employed.  Discuss the short- and long-term impact on the individual and society.
  9. Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to eating and control issues, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of  which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  10.  Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to substance-related issues and addictions, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of  which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  11. Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to sexual behavior and gender identity, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of  which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  12. Identify the major categories of psychological disorders relating to schizophrenia and other cognitive processes, including identity, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of  which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  13. Identify the major categories of personality disorders, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of  which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  14. Identify the major categories of developmental disorders and those relating to the aging process, their symptoms, diagnoses, and hypothesized etiology.  Critically evaluate the various therapeutic approaches proposed for each, with consideration of  which treatment is currently considered optimal.  Discuss the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects on the individual and the potential impact on society.
  15. Summarize the research regarding the social, cultural and political topics surrounding the legal aspects of abnormal behavior.  Articulate the arguments for various controversial issues in a balanced manner that is empirically supported, rather than showing a reliance on opinions only.

 Measurements for PSY 219:  Abnormal Psychology

Students will demonstrate their knowledge in these areas through: 

  1. formal examinations, which include objective questions, short answers, analysis of case studies and development of treatment plans;
  2. a formal written assignment presenting research from primary and secondary sources, critical evaluation of applied theories and synthesis of ideas through use of an approved format;
  3. articulation of ideas and concepts through verbal class participation; and
  4. exposure to assessment tools through active participation, with evaluation and understanding of the rationale expressed through formal written examination.  All of the above written components require competence in grammatical construction and organization of ideas to convey complex concepts in a coherent way. 

Outcomes for PSY 227 Animal Behavior

  1. Recognize and understand basic terms and concepts of animal behavior
  2. Articulate the basic ecological and evolutionary processes that shape animal behavior
  3. Discuss the relevance of non-human animal behavior to understanding the behavior of humans.
  4. Learn to use various professional sources, such as scientific journals, to learn more about animal behavior.
  5. Become familiar with the approaches used in laboratory and field settings to obtain information about animal behavior.
  6. Analyze patterns of behavior (e.g., territoriality and special distributions) and foraging strategies using statistical analyses and probability.
  7. Using a specific animal as a model, evaluate a theory of animal behavior in terms of its application to a category of behavior (e.g., demonstration of the critical components of sign stimuli in releasing fixed action patterns)

 

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